Revamp

This is our second issue and our second year out in the world. We thought this would be a perfect time to reevaluate what we want, and where we want to go.

Our revamp will be getting back to the basics of things. We are going to open our submissions ALL YEAR ROUND because hearing from sour voices is what’s most important to us.

We will be taking a break from blog posts, pulps!, and just taking time to focus on publishing.

The hope is to get TWO issues out per year!

 

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November 20, 2018 Newsletter

Lemon Star Magazine

November 20, 2018

orange lemon fruit vitamins
Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

SUBMISSIONS! 

Our submissions period is open until December 30th. Send us your juicy stuff!

December Pulp! 

Our December pulp! with Erin Slaughter on various forms has been cancelled. All other pulp! workshops are on a to-be-decided basis, due to low interest. We apologize for any inconvenience.

Last Week’s Blog! 

Our blogs and blog synopsis will not be included on our website or in our newsletter until after the holidays!

What We’re Reading! 

Sylvia – I’m reading Trampoline by Robert Gipe.

Gabriela – Rereading No Matter the Wreckage by Sarah Kay.

Sara – The Bassoon King: Art, Idiocy, and Other Sordid Tales from the Band Room by Rainn Wilson is my current read.

Follow Us At: 

@lemonstarmag on Twitter
@lemonstarmag on Instagram
Lemonstarmag.wordpress.com for blog posts, Issue 1, & more

November 12, 2018 Newsletter

Lemon Star Magazine

November 12, 2018

close up photo of sliced yellow lemon on white surface
Photo by Lukas on Pexels.com

Meet Gabriela Marchany! 

What is your role at LSM?

I am the Social Media Intern and a Prose Reader for Issue 2!

What is your favorite book?

Looking for the Gulf Motel by Richard Blanco & The New Yorker Short Stories by Ann Beattie. 

Do you have pets?

I have two kitties! Ron Swanson and Leslie Knope!

What’s one of your favorite things to do?

I love to nap, read, color and watch Netflix.

What does LSM mean to you?

Lemon Star Mag means a place to be, and exist as I am with no fear of rejection. A community of writers with open minds and hearts!

Submissions!

Our submissions period is open until December 30th. Send us your juicy stuff! 

December Pulp! 

Erin Slaughter on various forms! Follow the link to apply: 

https://lemonstarmag.wordpress.com/pulp/

Last Week’s Blog! 

Until further notice, our weekly blog recap will happen bi-weekly! Our lovely Bridget Dixon and Alec Masella are on a well deserved break, so Sylvia Collings is stepping in to help! 

What We’re Reading! 

Sylvia – I’m reading Black Klansman by Ron Stallworth. 

Gabriela – I am currently reading Felt in the Jaw by Kristin Arnett. 

Sara – The Bassoon King: Art, Idiocy, and Other Sordid Tales from the Band Room by Rainn Wilson is my current read. 

Follow Us At: 

@lemonstarmag on Twitter
@lemonstarmag on Instagram
Lemonstarmag.wordpress.com for blog posts, Issue 1, & more

November 3, 2018 Newsletter

Lemon Star Magazine

November 3, 2018

Meet Sylvia Collings! 

What is your role at LSM?

I am editor-in-chief.

What is your favorite book?

The Perks of Being a Wallflower, To Kill a Mockingbird and It’s Kind of a Funny Story.

Do you have pets?

I have one dog (Wallace) and five cats (Cupcake, Peaches, Neighbor, Blacktop and Hazelnut).

What’s one of your favorite things to do?

I love to write and watch Netflix.

What does LSM mean to you?

Lemon Star is a way to be myself in a world full of racists, sexist, ageist people.

Submissions!

Our submission period is open until Dec 30th. Send us your juicy stuff!

December Pulp!

Erin Slaughter on various forms! Follow the link to apply:

https://lemonstarmag.wordpress.com/pulp/

Last Week’s Blog!

For the week of October 15th – October 19th, Lemon Star Magazine did something a little special (and different!) for blog posts that followed. That weeks posts were inspired due to the lack of support and belief in women around the world. We felt it necessary to be a cornerstone for women, by sharing some of our favorite femme authors. We kicked off with Bridget sharing a more recent poem that was published by Abriana Jetté. Bridget expressed, “I remember learning about the purpose of writing, and was forced many times in earlier English classes to ask the question, “Is this an internal or external struggle the narrator is facing?” More often than not, they answer is yes. In the case of this poem, I thought yes as well.” The poem brought a sense of “awareness” and change in our world is necessary-and a good thing, usually. She closes on, “There is a quiet and angry voice that exists in all femme authors.”
The next piece in the series was written by Sylvia about the Nancy Drew series of books. Sylvia spoke of how important those novels were, and why. “When I was about 9 or 10, my grandmother gave me a set of Nancy Drew Mystery Books. They were the first 5 books with shiny covers and a box to keep them together. At night, my father would kneel down beside my bunk bed and read me a chapter, sometimes more if I begged him.” Speaking on the experience of a robbery too close to home, Sylvia wanted to be like Nancy Drew and help create an investigation. Infuriation grew as Sylvia realized they would not discover who committed the crime. Rage in a woman is no friend to anyone, which became a connected trait to the time period of this blog series.
Lastly, but not in the least- Alec raved about Shirley Jackson. Specifically, The Lottery. Alec indulged our readers with the memory of how he came across this fantastic powerhouse of a femme writer! “So I asked Ms. Woods one day what it was about, and her eyes just got kind of big and she laughed. “You’ll just have to give it a read, it’s not that long.” Now, this was before everything imaginable was freely available online. So when I got home from school that day, I told my dad that we had to go to the bookstore and get some “assigned” reading for my literature class. And that’s how I wound up with Shirley Jackson’s The Lottery and Other Stories.” A little white lie never hurt, right? He highlights the beauty of dark literature of which he was not familiar with at such a young age. Alec made the final comment of, “As a writer, I’ve learned how to simplify the unnatural and naturalize the harshness of reality. Jackson knows how to understate her stories to achieve the twisted realism that is life. And above all, she’s made me more keen on noticing strange events and people, and thinking “That, too, is somebody’s normal.”

What We’re Reading!

Sylvia – I’m reading Black Klansman by Ron Stallworth. And I’m trying to finish my novel.

Bridget – I’m reading an issue of poemmemoirstory, but it’s now called Nelle!

Gabriela – I am currently reading Felt in the Jaw by Kristin Arnett.

Sara – The Bassoon King: Art, Idiocy, and Other Sordid Tales from the Band Room by Rainn Wilson is my current read.

Follow us at:

@lemonstarmag on Twitter
@lemonstarmag on Instagram
Lemonstarmag.wordpress.com for blog posts, Issue 1, & more

October 28th ‘Welcome Back’ Newsletter

Lemon Star Magazine

October 28, 2018

We’re Back!

Hey, Lemonheads! We’ve been in the dark for quite some time, but we’re getting back to business. 

Sylvia Collings, our fearless Editor-in-Chief, has been working hard to manage LSM since the opening of the reading period.

Lacey Trautwein, our Co-Founder and Advisory Chair has been helping as much as possible while balancing life. 

Sara La Cotti, our Social Coordinator, was out of the country for almost two months completing a publishing program in Oxford through Columbia University. 

Alec Masella, our lovely Editorial Intern, has been helping hold down the blog posts. 

Bridget Dixon, our Content and Workshop Coordinator, has been killing the promotions game.  

We welcomed Gabriela Marchany to our team as the Social Media Intern! 

We also have a great list of reader’s for our submissions period, like Brent Coughenour, Maddy Hamilton, and Gabriela Marchany. 

Our submissions editors include the rockstars Kimber Grey and Ashley Taylor. 

What to Expect

We’re attempting big changes to LSM, especially trying to engage our Lemonheads more with our staff. The weekly newsletter will have interviews from staff, what we are reading, news from the team, submissions periods, Pulp! workshops, and more! 

News for this Week

Our November Pulp! is with Chloe Clark talking about strange and usual poetry (Apply! Apply! Apply!). 

Our submission period is open until Dec 30th, so send us your stuff! 

 

We sincerely love each and every one of our supporters, even through un-engaged periods. Life hits hard sometimes, but having a system of love, encouragement, and the magic of reading/writing goes above and beyond what we expected from our little home-grown magazine. Continue being juicy with us, Lemonheads!

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Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

Favorite Femme Authors Pt.3

Since the eighth grade, my favorite author has been Shirley Jackson. And she just happens to be a woman!

I remember the way Ms. Woods’ classroom was decorated. There was the token fake tree by the window, the ever popular tall brown bookshelf in the corner, filled with textbooks and marked up novels from her college days, and all around the walls were posters of book covers. There was Pride and Prejudice, The Great Gatsby, To Kill a Mockingbird, and somewhere amid all of those huge award-winning novels was “The Lottery” by Shirley Jackson.

It was the only work I hadn’t really heard of until that class. So I asked Ms. Woods one day what it was about, and her eyes just got kind of big and she laughed. “You’ll just have to give it a read, it’s not that long.”

Now, this was before everything imaginable was freely available online. So when I got home from school that day, I told my dad that we had to go to the bookstore and get some “assigned” reading for my literature class. And that’s how I wound up with Shirley Jackson’s The Lottery and Other Stories.

Of course, “The Lottery” was the first story I read- but it was hardly the only one I loved. All throughout the rest of middle school, I appreciated how dark her stories were. I had never been exposed to modern gothic literature before, and yet there I was reading the most chilling stories wherever I could. I took that collection everywhere- church, my grandma’s house, the beach, the bus, everywhere.

As I got older, I began to look at her work much differently. Sure, they were still uncanny and would capture the most unsettling aspects of rural- and occasionally urban- American life. But the very way she captured such unusual moments of life in the U.S., I noticed, was incredible.

Her writing paces itself. It doesn’t need to be experimental or flashy. The form is never unique. But that’s the key: the steadiness of the narration and the simplicity of language and dialogue contrast so starkly and eerily to the unusual and often grotesque subject matter.

“The Witch,” for instance, is a short-short story about a child and his mother on a train. At one of the stops, a man walks in and sits beside the boy. He then proceeds to tell the boy about the gruesome murder of his sister, committed by his truly. The boy, perked with interest, asks if the sister was a witch.

When I’m reading Jackson, I feel as though I’m in a universe all her own. It’s as if every one of her novels, shorts, and short-shorts are held together by taut, creaking rope. And it’s perhaps that element of her work that I love so much. It runs parallel to reality and makes me think about the underbelly of every day life.

As a writer, I’ve learned how to simplify the unnatural and naturalize the harshness of reality. Jackson knows how to understate her stories to achieve the twisted realism that is life. And above all, she’s made me more keen on noticing strange events and people, and thinking “That, too, is somebody’s normal.”

– Alec James

Follow him on twitter:

@alecatrazisland

Favorite Femme Authors Pt.2

When I was about 9 or 10, my grandmother gave me a set of Nancy Drew Mystery Books. They were the first 5 books with shiny covers and a box to keep them together. At night, my father would kneel down beside my bunkbed and read me a chapter, sometimes more if I begged him. 

 

I remember there was a robbery where we lived. Someone smashed a car window to snatch a purse. My father was on the phone with officials who claimed nothing could be down until the credit cards were used; the best bet was just to call the bank and cancel all the cars. I overheard, and grabbed my sleuthing kit which included finger print dust. I went with my father to the crime scene, sprinkled the dust all around the car, looked through my magnifying glass and then we took to the trails close by. We thought the prep would probably sneak this way to get away from people. Of course, we didnt find them, but in the moment I felt so angry for the victim that I wanted, needed, to help.

 

Today, I tend to get overly angry over everything which pushes me to become a better person, a better woman. Nancy Drew was one of the first people who taught me about feminism and agism, yet she didnt let it stop her from kicking ass and taking names. 

 

On May 30, 2002, Mildred Benson died. She was Carolyn Keene for the first 23 out of 30 Nancy Drew novels. Benson was an anonymous ghostwriter for the epic tales. She was often given just a title and outline and wrote them into 200-page masterpieces. Once she crafted 13 in one year. She, in addition, was working full time as a newspaper reporter. Her payment for Nancy Drew was $125 a book and Christmas bonuses, yet she signed away all rights. Mildred defined Nancy in The Secret of the Old Clock setting up the next generations of Nancy Drew spin offs. 

 

Mildred described Nancy as someone who believed in her own freedom, in an interview with Salon in 1999. She said, The girls were ripe for a change in literature. They were way overdue for a good entertaining story that broke away from the old style of writing. I think Nancy was the character the girls were waiting for. 

 

Mrs. Benson was the first person to earn a masters in journalism at the University of Iowa in 1993. She held a symposium about the importance of Nancy Drew. As a child, Mildred hated dolls and only aspired to be a writer. After graduation, she worked at a place for anonymous writers called the Stratemeyer Syndicate where she started writing for the Ruth Fielding series. Which lead to Nancy. Mildred worked on many other projects there and published other books under her own pseudonyms and some under her own name.

 

Nancy has been modernized, since, for todays generations. She retains many of her same attributes that made her lovable. 

 

Source: nytimes.com, nancydrewsleuth.com, articles.latimes.com

– Sylvia Collings

You can find her on twitter sharing poetry inspo @sylviacollings